empty (places)

Louise Lawler, Salon Hodler, 1992–93. Silver dye bleach print (Ilfochrome) mounted on paperboard,
48 × 57 7/16 in. (121.9 × 145.9 cm). Edition no. 2/5. Whitney Museum of American Art,
New York; purchase with funds from the Photography Committee 94.23

Robert Motherwell, Afternoon in Barcelona, 1958.
Synthetic polymer and oil on canvas, 54 × 72 in. (137.2 × 182.9 cm).
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; gift of Robert and Jane Meyerhoff 79.35
Art © Dedalus Foundation, Inc./Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY



the paintings

Jess was born Burgess Franklin Collins in Long Beach, California. He was drafted into the military and worked on the production of plutonium for the Manhattan Project. After his discharge in 1946, Jess worked at the Hanford Atomic Energy Project in Richland, Washington, and painted in his spare time, but his dismay at the threat of atomic weapons led him to abandon his scientific career and focus on his art. (via)


Richard Mosse

"For centuries, the Congo has compelled and defied the Western imagination. Richard Mosse brings to this subject the use of a discontinued military surveillance technology, a type of color infrared film called Kodak Aerochrome. Originally developed for camouflage detection, this aerial reconnaissance film registers an invisible spectrum of infrared light, rendering the green landscape in vivid hues of lavender, crimson, and hot pink. "

from here


Matias Faldbakken

"...spent bullets are strewn all over the floor like a Wiley Coyote trap or perilous Marx Brothers bait. One half expects to go realing, arms windmilling, up into the air and then flat on your back, defeated. But picking through the shells – nudging them or violently kicking them out of the way to make a path – is a welcome challenge that feels like a trangression in some sacred space."


Bret Slater

This very kind guy is on the up and up. So good to see good people do well.